When it’s one of those races

up2in2:

 


micdotcom:

Watch: Female Russian cosmonaut is a boss, shuts down sexist reporter 

"Can you tell me more about your everyday life on the station? How are you planning to do your hair?"
That was an actual question asked of Yelena Serova at press conference about her upcoming trip to the ISS. Apparently only female cosmonauts can be asked about their hair and grooming routines, even if they’re about to make history.   
Her answer is amazing | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

Watch: Female Russian cosmonaut is a boss, shuts down sexist reporter 

"Can you tell me more about your everyday life on the station? How are you planning to do your hair?"

That was an actual question asked of Yelena Serova at press conference about her upcoming trip to the ISS. Apparently only female cosmonauts can be asked about their hair and grooming routines, even if they’re about to make history.   

Her answer is amazing | Follow micdotcom

(via gender-and-science)


thatssoscience:

NIH Announces $10.1 Million Worth of Grants to Combat Gender Bias in the Lab
This week, the NIH announced grants worth around $10.1 million to combat gender bias in research. Traditionally medical research focused on male subjects. Even when working with animals such as mice and rats, researches still favored male specimens. When women make up more than half the population, why is Male still seen as the default? Scientists want the most clean-cut results possible.  Women are frequently seen as variables to be controlled for. Not only were young, white male, undergraduates readily available, males don’t have the pesky hormonal fluctuations that women do. Yet the belief that the estrous cycle needs to be controlled for or monitored is false.  
Dr. Janine Austin Clayton, associate director for women’s health research at N.I.H.  called for this bias to be addressed early this year in a commentary in the journal Nature. She said this bias has caused a huge gap in scientific knowledge, “we literally know less about every aspect of female biology compared to male biology”. Unfortunately, this bias for male subjects has lead to damage outside of the lab. 
Women reportedly suffer more severe side-effects of new drugs, the effects on women weren’t discovered until after the drug hit the market. Recent studies of the sleep aid Ambien showed that women metabolize the drug differently than men. The drug stayed in their bodies longer and had greater potential for next-day impairment. The drug had previously been tested mostly in males.   After being on the market for a decade, the FDA finally recommended that women should reduce their dose by half.
Even the gender of researchers can have an unnoticed effect on studies. Rumors that the gender of researchers affects the lab animals existed for years. A study published early this year gave credence to such whispers. Researchers from the Mcgill University in Quebec found that mice and rats reacted differently to pain based on who was in the room with them. They showed elevated blood levels of the stress hormone corticosterone when men were in the room or even when the scent of a male was present in the room. The presence of women seemed to counteract this effect. It was suggest that in future studies the gender of the researchers should be published. 
The bias affects the way we understand diseases too. Did you know that women experience heart attacks differently than men?  Symptoms for women include, chest pain or discomfort, shortness of breath, nausea, and jaw pain. Tons of other diseases are more prevalent in women, depression, thyroid, migraines, etc. and lacked proper research for decades due to the ingrained gender bias.
Sex is a biological variable, but one that shouldn’t be ignored. With women making up more than half the population on this planet, its essential drugs get tested in everyone (and I mean everyone, not just those that fit into a binary of male/female). It’s essential that we know how diseases affect people differently depending on sex. These recent grants from the NIH are a huge step in the right direction.  But it makes you wonder, how has this skewed results for decades of research?

thatssoscience:

NIH Announces $10.1 Million Worth of Grants to Combat Gender Bias in the Lab

This week, the NIH announced grants worth around $10.1 million to combat gender bias in research. Traditionally medical research focused on male subjects. Even when working with animals such as mice and rats, researches still favored male specimens. When women make up more than half the population, why is Male still seen as the default? Scientists want the most clean-cut results possible.  Women are frequently seen as variables to be controlled for. Not only were young, white male, undergraduates readily available, males don’t have the pesky hormonal fluctuations that women do. Yet the belief that the estrous cycle needs to be controlled for or monitored is false.  

Dr. Janine Austin Clayton, associate director for women’s health research at N.I.H.  called for this bias to be addressed early this year in a commentary in the journal Nature. She said this bias has caused a huge gap in scientific knowledge, “we literally know less about every aspect of female biology compared to male biology”. Unfortunately, this bias for male subjects has lead to damage outside of the lab. 

Women reportedly suffer more severe side-effects of new drugs, the effects on women weren’t discovered until after the drug hit the market. Recent studies of the sleep aid Ambien showed that women metabolize the drug differently than men. The drug stayed in their bodies longer and had greater potential for next-day impairment. The drug had previously been tested mostly in males.   After being on the market for a decade, the FDA finally recommended that women should reduce their dose by half.

Even the gender of researchers can have an unnoticed effect on studies. Rumors that the gender of researchers affects the lab animals existed for years. A study published early this year gave credence to such whispers. Researchers from the Mcgill University in Quebec found that mice and rats reacted differently to pain based on who was in the room with them. They showed elevated blood levels of the stress hormone corticosterone when men were in the room or even when the scent of a male was present in the room. The presence of women seemed to counteract this effect. It was suggest that in future studies the gender of the researchers should be published. 

The bias affects the way we understand diseases too. Did you know that women experience heart attacks differently than men?  Symptoms for women include, chest pain or discomfort, shortness of breath, nausea, and jaw pain. Tons of other diseases are more prevalent in women, depression, thyroid, migraines, etc. and lacked proper research for decades due to the ingrained gender bias.

Sex is a biological variable, but one that shouldn’t be ignored. With women making up more than half the population on this planet, its essential drugs get tested in everyone (and I mean everyone, not just those that fit into a binary of male/female). It’s essential that we know how diseases affect people differently depending on sex. These recent grants from the NIH are a huge step in the right direction.  But it makes you wonder, how has this skewed results for decades of research?

(via gender-and-science)


crofethr:

denali-winter:

BAM.

I have never hit reblog so fast in my LIFE.

(via yelyahwilliams)


(via ache)


When the novice coxswain suddenly learns how to be aggressive


beatonna:

Ahh, more of the Miserable Father images from suffragette times. It’s a favourite old meme because imagine caring for your children?  noooooo not my childreeennnn

beatonna:

Ahh, more of the Miserable Father images from suffragette times. It’s a favourite old meme because imagine caring for your children?  noooooo not my childreeennnn


supernatasha:

The Barefoot College in Tilonia, Rajasthan was started by an Indian man named Bunker Roy. The organization is essentially a college that teaches women from all over the world (but primarily “developing” countries) how to be solar engineers. 

That’s right. Solar engineers.

Classes are attended by local women and women from Peru, Fiji, Rwanda, Nepal, Belize, Ethiopia, Bhutan, and more who are illiterate or semi-literate. Most of them are from rural and poverty-stricken areas. The school does not take attendance, have exams, demand their students speak English or have prior education, and does not ask for fees. These women learn how to make solar panels and bulbs, how to plug them into an electrical grid, and how to provide clean renewable energy to their entire village. They then take this knowledge back to their hometowns in distant countries. 

How are they taught without a common language? Everything technical is color coded. The women learn important words “LED, wire cutter, copper, connection, etc.” They communicate through common sense and the desire to learn. The college accepts anyone and everyone, mothers, lower castes (still an ongoing problem in India), older women, young women, women who have never attended school, married women. 

Since 2004, the College has taught at least 250 women from 41 different low-industrial countries to be solar engineers. 5 out of their 8 engineer professors are women. 35 out of 200 workers are physically disabled. The BC is currently powering both their own facility, homes in nearby villages and towns, and their former students are powering homes all across the world from wisdom and materials imported from the BC. Their local villages pay their salary. 

Roy did try to teach both men and women, but they didn’t stay in the harsh conditions or wanted jobs that paid more (as the BC doesn’t hand out “official” diplomas or degrees). Eventually, the college became largely female. "Why not invest in women, older women, mature women, gutsy women who have roots in the village?" Roy said.

I cannot emphasize how amazing this organization is. The Barefoot College is a safe and accepting place for anyone who wants to learn about clean and renewable energy. It encourages women’s empowerment, helps them out of poverty, and provides solar energy to places where the prices of kerosene and batteries are excessively high.

Sources (please look over them as there are more pictures and I could never do justice to how incredible this entire thing is with just my own words): [x][x][x][x][x][Bunker’s Ted Talk][Donate]

(via gender-and-science)


h0odrich:

mom: where are you going its almost midnight

me: out

image

(via the-b-grade)


staff:

Have a great weekend, Tumblr. 


compoundchem:

copesetic:

compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!
You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

I thought velvet ants were considered wasps. >:

It seems they are indeed! I got caught out by that one, assuming from the name that they were ants. I’ll blame being a chemist; I assumed biologists would name things based on what they are, so I didn’t double check :) I’ll change it on the post on the site!

compoundchem:

copesetic:

compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!

You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

I thought velvet ants were considered wasps. >:

It seems they are indeed! I got caught out by that one, assuming from the name that they were ants. I’ll blame being a chemist; I assumed biologists would name things based on what they are, so I didn’t double check :) I’ll change it on the post on the site!



(via nmnmu)


(via nmnmu)